Spoon’s Content Manager Malin Dahlberg works almost exclusively with PostNord’s internal and external communications. In this article, she shares ...

PostNord Sweden caught criminal gang red handed

Spoon’s Content Manager Malin Dahlberg works almost exclusively with PostNord’s internal and external communications. In this article, she shares three examples of groundbreaking content that beat native advertising records.   

Public confidence in PostNord has plummeted in the past two years. Mass media coverage has been critical of the logistics company for quite some time. Barely a day passed without the press publishing negative stories about missing letters, long delivery times and broken packages.

The company chose to respond to the criticism through native advertising.

‘One of the advantages of really good native, that feels relevant and credible, is that it attracts readership in a way that banner ads can’t match. It also gives the opportunity to deep-dive into complex topics, and uniquely re-position the brand,’ says Malin Dahlberg.

Here are three examples of PostNord’s groundbreaking content.

All you need to know about the packages from China

‘When the China packages became a heated debate in Sweden, we wrote several articles on the topic, to truly find out what was going on, which the readers appreciated very much. We’re still getting clicks on this article – even a year afterwards,’ says Malin.

PostNord Sweden caught criminal gang red handed

’PostNord’s security is world-class and the story about how they caught an international criminal gang was picked up by international media. The film we produced for the native story has over 500,000 views on YouTube, in Swedish, and over 350,000 views in English,’ Malin says.

Moved mailboxes – pure genius

‘This, on the surface, innocent story about PostNord’s initiative to move mailboxes and trash bins to the same side of the street for the sake of the environment, became the spring’s most read story in 2018. As an editor, I fought to write it, while others were skeptical. But there was something human, honest, win-win nice about it that I thought people would read, and I was right,’ Malin recalls.