Content marketing secrets

Campaigns or content marketing?

By 11th May 2019 No Comments
campaigns or content marketing

There is a fundamental difference between campaign-based marketing and content marketing. Campaigns provide fast results while content marketing builds trust and loyalty over time. Most companies need both campaigns and content.

I have held a presentation several times in recent weeks on how to measure the impact of content marketing. An important part of this presentation is about the fundamental differences between campaign-based marketing and content marketing.

I often compare traditional campaign-based marketing to fireworks. They are colourful, eye-catching, expensive and spectacular. But when the campaign is over and the fireworks are silenced, it leaves little effect on its target audience. Campaign-based marketing is good for reaching a wide scope and achieving fast results, but it is not a long-term strategy. Between campaigns, you lose contact with your audience.

When the campaign is over, the content remains

Content marketing, on the other hand, can be compared to campfires around which the audience gather, discuss and become involved. They are not particularly spectacular, but they are effective. Content marketing aims to involve audiences in the long term, create loyalty, strengthen the brand and create more and new business.

Unlike short-lived campaigns, the content you are creating is a resource that has long – almost eternal – life.

Campaigns + Content = Success

Most companies need both fireworks and campfires in their marketing. Regardless of whether the fireworks are lavish commercials, ads in the local newspaper or sponsored posts on social media, their aim is to reach a new, larger audience. If you succeed at the same time in creating content that captures the newfound interest of the audience and retain their commitment over time, then you have found a balance that is both effective and sustainable.

There are examples where the border between fireworks and campfires becomes blurred, such as in this film from Emirates which creates scope while generating a talking point.